Skip to main content

en Español

Ask the Expert

Webinars

FASD Research Review





Private Resources | Federal Government Resources | State and Tribal Government Resources | Publications and Educational Materials | Toolkits, Professional Guides, and Curriculums | Books and Educational Materials

Private Resources

Alaska Native Justice Center

The Alaska Native Justice Center (ANJC) is a nonprofit organization that strives to serve the unmet needs of the Alaska Native community by acting as a bridge between the community and the civil and criminal justice systems. The ANJC Web site lists contact information and highlights the center’s history, mission, and goals. In addition, ANJC Youth law services offers Alcohol & Drug Information School (ADIS), which is available statewide for individuals convicted of crimes related to alcohol use. ANJC also offers family law services that seek to resolve custody–related issues.

Phone: 907-793-3550
Web site: www.anjc.org Exit Disclaimer Graphic

American Indian Family Center — Wakanyeja Kin Wakan Pi (Our Children Are Sacred), Minnesota

The Wakanyeja Kin Wakan Pi program is a part of the American Indian Family Center. The program addresses issues related to and resulting from substance abuse and FASD and prenatal substance exposure. The Wakanyeja Kin Wakan Pi program provides a comprehensive array of services, including mental health services, support groups, and therapy; a wellness and recovery program; and a case manager devoted to working with women who need recovery services. The program also provides education for parents and pregnant moms and referrals for FASD diagnostic services as appropriate.

Phone: 651-793-3803
Web site: www.aifc.net Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health

The Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health supports the health of American Indians and Alaska Natives through research, training, technical assistance, publications, and continuing education. The centers have conducted research in child welfare, Head Start, risk factors for FASD, mental health, and other topics. Training and workshops are offered on digital storytelling, telehealth, and Native elder research. Projects are funded by various agencies and organizations.

Phone: 303-724-1414
Web site: www.ucdenver.edu/academics/colleges/PublicHealth/research/centers/CAIANH/NCAIANMHR/ Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Hawaii Salvation Army Family Treatment Services

The Hawaii Salvation Army Family Treatment Services provides a continuum of services for women struggling with substance abuse, including a residential and outpatient program for women, therapeutic living for women in recovery, transitional housing, a preschool, and a therapeutic nursery. Many of the clients are Native Hawaiians. The organization has embraced a culturally appropriate holistic approach to treatment and recovery addressing spiritual, physical, social, family, and psychological aspects. Traditional Western, evidence-based practices such as cognitive behavioral therapy are used in the programs.

Phone: 808-732-2802
Web site: www.salvationarmyhawaii.org Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Ho’omau Ke Ola, Hawaii

Ho’omau Ke Ola is a Hawaiian substance abuse treatment center that provides a spectrum of services, including residential, outpatient, and transitional substance abuse treatment services. Ho'omau Ke Ola welcomes clients from the community and those referred from other sources. Traditional beliefs and values have been incorporated into the services. Through a cross-cultural view on healing and substance abuse treatment, clients participate in activities including community service, gardening, hula, and lei making.

Phone: 808-696-4266
Web site: http://www.hoomaukeola.org

Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan — Healthy Start

The Inter-Tribal Council of Michigan subcontracts eight tribal and urban sites for Healthy Start in Michigan. These sites provide services in the Bay Mills Indian Community, Hannahville Indian Community, Keweenaw Bay Indian Community, Lac Vieux Desert Band, Little Traverse Bay Bands, Saginaw Chippewa Tribe, the Grand Rapids Metro Area, and the Detroit Metro Area. The services are open to all but target Native Americans. The Healthy Start program complements parental, postnatal, and pediatric medical care for pregnant women. All women in the program are educated about the dangers of prenatal and postnatal alcohol use. Women in recovery from substance abuse are provided with support services, which can continue up to 2 years after delivery.

Phone: 906-632-6896
Toll-free: 800-562-4957 or 877-482-3601
Web site: www.itcmi.org/departments/child-family-services/ Exit Disclaimer Graphic

National Asian Pacific American Families Against Substance Abuse

National Asian Pacific American Families Against Substance Abuse provides current information and resources on substance abuse issues in the Asian American and Pacific Islander communities. The Web site includes facts and resources, news and announcements, information on the organization’s projects and events, and fact sheets and publications on Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, as well as resources and links.

Phone: 213-625-5795 or 916-448-5911
Web site: www.napafasa.org Exit Disclaimer Graphic

National Indian Child Welfare Association

The National Indian Child Welfare Association (NICWA) provides public policy research and advocacy, information and training on Indian child welfare, and community development services. The association serves a broad national audience, including tribal governments and programs; State child welfare agencies; and other organizations and agencies, as well as professionals interested in the field of Indian child welfare. NICWA has projects in a number of areas, including children’s mental health, substance abuse, endangered children, and training of child welfare workers. The Web site includes listings of services and resources and information related to policy and research.

Phone: 503-222-4044
Web site: www.nicwa.org Exit Disclaimer Graphic

National Indian Justice Center

The National Indian Justice Center (NIJC) has developed a curriculum on fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) that “…promotes a tribal multi-disciplinary team approach for responding to persons with FAS and alcohol related neuro-developmental disorder (ARND) who are involved in the tribal justice system as defendants, witnesses and/or victim” (NIJC Web site). The overarching goals of the curriculum are to “…increase awareness of FAS/ARND among tribal justice system personnel and to reduce the secondary disabilities associated with FAS/ARND, specifically those that result in increased criminal behavior among or victimization of persons with FAS/ARND” (NIJC Web site).

NIJC provides trainings with the FAS curriculum across the United States. The Department of Justice has combined the FAS and sexual violence curriculums for use in trainings the department has sponsored across the United States. Training can be requested from NIJC, and participants pay tuition for trainings. The FAS curriculum can be accessed on the NIJC Web site, and FAS/ARND components have been added to other NIJC curriculums, including those on child abuse, neglect, and sexual abuse and on improving tribal courts.

Phone: 707-579-5507
Toll-free: 800-966-0662
Web site: www.nijc.org/fas/ Exit Disclaimer Graphic

National Indian Parent Information Center

The National Indian Parent Information Center (NIPIC) is funded by the U.S. Department of Education. NIPIC provides information on disabilities for families of children with disabilities and professionals that work with disabled children. The center provides individual consultation and workshops on disability laws and parent leadership. Workshops are provided on and off reservations to tribes, Nations, and clans. Topics for disability workshops include child rights, Individualized Education Programs (IEPs), parent rights, and Section 504. Issues discussed in parent leadership training include locating resources for families and increasing parent-professional partnerships. Services are free to family members nationwide and are culturally appropriate for American Indian communities.

Phone: 541-244-1822
Toll-free: 855-720-2910
Web site: www.nipic.org Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Native American Children’s Alliance

The mission of the Native American Children’s Alliance (NACA) is to improve the “…response to Native American and…[Alaska] Native child victims of maltreatment and their families.” NACA seeks to accomplish this mission by providing (1) support and information on legal systems; (2) assistance in developing sustainability for child abuse initiatives in Indian Country; and (3) training for creation of child advocacy centers and multidisciplinary teams for Native communities, which coordinate responses and services for victims of child abuse. Trainings are conducted by request and through collaboration with national partners. NACA has also developed resources including a fact sheet on Child Sexual Abuse in Indian Country and a public awareness campaign kit on child abuse.

Phone: 918-683-5291
Web site: www.nativechildalliance.org Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board — The Northwest Tribal FASD Project

The Northwest Tribal FASD Project seeks to address these disorders through development of model projects and multidisciplinary, collaborative partnerships in American Indian communities in Idaho, Oregon, and Washington State. This project focuses on training in community assessment and data gathering and assistance in establishing a systems-based approach to FASD in the communities where model projects are being developed. The Web site provides downloadable publications and resources on FASD that are targeted to American Indians. The Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board also has several other projects related to health in American Indian communities.

Phone: 503-228-4185
Web site: www.npaihb.org/programs/the_northwest_tribal_fetal_alcohol_spectrum_disorders_project/ Exit Disclaimer Graphic

One Sky Center

The One Sky Center is a National Resource Center for American Indian and Alaska Native Health, Education and Research. It is dedicated to quality health care across Indian Country. The center identifies culturally appropriate, effective, evidence-based substance abuse prevention and treatment practices and disseminates this information to tribal communities. The One Sky Center provides individualized technical assistance with community needs assessment, services planning and collaboration, program development and evaluation, identification of funding mechanisms and opportunities, and assistance with advocacy. The Web site contains information on services, education, news and events, and resources.

Phone: 503-494-3703
Web site: www.oneskycenter.org Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Stone Soup Group FASD Parent Support, Alaska

Stone Soup Group is a nonprofit agency created to address the health and well-being of Native Alaskan children with special needs and their families. The group assists and supports families throughout Alaska. It provides information about community-based diagnostic teams, local agencies, and programs that work with families, children, and adults affected by FASD. The Web site contains information on strategies for helping children with brain-based learning differences; a list of FASD resources and support groups; lists of books, videos, and newsletters; and links to State and national FASD resources. An e-mail discussion group (Listserv) is available for parents and caregivers of individuals with an FASD, to network, seek advice, and support one another. Stone Soup Group is proud to be the nationally recognized, federally funded, Family-to-Family Health Information Center and Parent Training & Information Center for the State of Alaska. The group also offers workshops on basic information on FASD and auditory, balance, and visual exercises and workshop series on becoming a more effective caregiver. In addition, Stone Soup Group sponsors Nintendo Wii Clubs for children and youth with developmental disabilities, play dates, and an annual community picnic.

Phone: 907-561-3701
Toll-free: 877-786-7327
Web site: www.stonesoupgroup.org/FASD.html Exit Disclaimer Graphic

White Bison

White Bison is an American Indian nonprofit charitable organization that offers sobriety, recovery, addiction prevention, and wellness learning resources to the Native American community nationwide. Since 1988, the organization has offered healing resources. The Web site includes information about the Wellbriety Movement – a recovery process that uses the healthy principles, laws, and values of traditional culture. White Bison offers community workshops on a variety of topics, including grief, loss, and Intergenerational trauma, the Medicine Wheel and 12–Step program, substance abuse prevention in youth, and Wellbriety. Workshops are approached from a holistic perspective and in a variety of settings.

Phone: 719-548-1000
Toll-free: 877-871-1495
Web site: www.whitebison.org Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Back to Top

Federal Government Resources

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Since 1991, CDC has been involved in FASD-related activities.The mission of the CDC FAS Prevention Team “to prevent fetal alcohol syndrome and other prenatal alcohol-related conditions and ameliorate these conditions in children already affected” (CDC Web site). The FASD Regional Training Centers are funded through the CDC function to create, implement, and evaluate curriculums for prevention and to facilitate identification of FASD and care of persons with an FASD. The centers incorporate the curriculums in training programs throughout the respective region. CDC has collaborated with other organizations to develop a toolkit for women’s health care providers, a school-based curriculum for teachers to use with children, a curriculum for tribal justice system personnel, and other materials and publications. CDC is funding three sites, in Arizona, Colorado, and New York, to establish or enhance population-based FAS surveillance.

Phone: 800-CDC-INFO (800-232-4636)
Web site: www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/fasd/index.html

Indian Health Service

The Indian Health Service (IHS) Behavioral Health Program strives to eliminate alcoholism and other drug dependencies and to improve the health care of American Indians and Alaska Natives (AI/AN). In 2004, IHS began to screen female patients for alcohol use, to identify and treat alcohol abuse and prevent fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The Parent-Child Assistance Program is an evidence-based, FASD intervention program serving pregnant and parenting women and girls with high-risk of substance abuse, at 10 sites throughout the State of Washington. The program also funds the Northwest Tribal FASD Project at the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board. IHS and the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) have established a 3-year interagency agreement to implement and evaluate Project CHOICES, an evidence-based program that addresses risky drinking by providing education and counseling to women and girls of childbearing age who access the clinic for women’s preventive health services.

Phone: 301-443-2038 (Division of Behavioral Health)
Web site: www.ihs.gov/behavioral/

Interagency Coordinating Committee on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Spectrum Disorders

The Interagency Coordinating Committee on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Spectrum Disorders (ICCFASD) is hosted by the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism. The goal of ICCFASD is to improve communication, cooperation, and collaboration among Federal agencies with programs on FASD or a special interest in FASD. Committee members work to exchange information and coordinate Federal FAS strategies and programs. ICCFASD has work groups that address the following issues: diagnosis; women, drinking, and pregnancy; the justice system; and education. Other ICCFASD work groups focus on relevant work of Federal Government agencies including: the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS); CDC; the Maternal and Child Health Bureau, Health Resources and Services Administration; IHS; the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health; the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA); the Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, U.S. Department of Education; and the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention, U.S. Department of Justice.

Phone: 301-443-3860 (NIAAA Communications/Public Information)
Web site: www.niaaa.nih.gov/research/major-initiatives/fetal-alcohol-spectrum-disorders

SAMHSA FASD Center for Excellence

The Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), an agency of HHS, is the lead Federal agency addressing substance abuse and mental health services. SAMHSA's mission is to build resilience and facilitate recovery for people with or at risk for substance abuse and mental illness. The mission of the SAMHSA FASD Center for Excellence is to facilitate the development and improvement of prevention, treatment, and care systems addressing FASD by providing national leadership and facilitating collaboration in the field. The goals are to (1) reduce the number of infants born with prenatal exposure to alcohol, (2) increase functioning of persons who have an FASD, and (3) improve quality of life for individuals and families affected by FASD. Fact sheets and brochures can be downloaded from the Web site, which includes a searchable database of research findings and other materials on FASD. The FASD Center also offers training and technical assistance and a toll-free help line.

Phone: 866-STOPFAS (866-786-7327)
Web site: fasdcenter.samhsa.gov

SAMHSA Office of Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse

The Office of Indian Alcohol and Substance Abuse (OIASA), SAMHSA, was created as a result of the Tribal Law and Order Act, to coordinate across Federal agencies that address alcohol and substance abuse issues. The goal of the Federal partnerships is to provide an infrastructure to develop a holistic approach in support of efforts to prevent and treat alcohol and substance abuse among American Indians and Alaska Natives. OIASA’s quarterly newsletter, Prevention & Recovery, highlights successful practices and stories in Indian Country and provides information and resources on alcohol and drug abuse for communities. OIASA collaborates in the development of a framework for setting interagency communication goals and provides technical assistance to tribal governments to develop and enhance prevention and treatment programs for alcohol and substance abuse.

Phone: 240-276-0549
Web site: www.samhsa.gov/TLOA/

Back to Top

State and Tribal Government Resources

Alaska Division of Behavioral Health, Prevention and Early Intervention — Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Project

The Alaska Division of Behavioral Health, Prevention and Early Intervention provides a community-based, multidisciplinary, and culturally appropriate approach to FASD issues. The division provides training and technical assistance to organizations and agencies in the State of Alaska. The Web site lists the diagnostic clinics in the Diagnostic Team Network, as well as other resources including videos, fact sheets, brochures, and posters.

Phone: 907-465-4984
Web site: http://dhss.alaska.gov/dbh/fas Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Choctaw Nation Health Services — Chi Hullo Li, Oklahoma

Choctaw Nation Chi Hullo Li is a long-term, comprehensive, culturally sensitive residential treatment program for Native American women who are parenting or pregnant and their children. Participants must reside in Oklahoma and be age 18 years or older. The primary goals are to help clients stop substance abuse, develop strong families, and improve social functioning and to form support networks in client families and the communities.

Phone: 918-567-2905
Web site: www.choctawnation.com/services/departments/health-services/ Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Navajo Nation Department of Behavioral Health Services

The Navajo Nation provides training and technical assistance on FASD to treatment centers, behavioral health agencies, schools, courts, and social services. Training is also offered to jail and prison inmates, parents raising children with special needs, and foster or adoptive parents. Trainings are often translated into the Navajo language, and neighboring tribes such as the Hopi may also request trainings. The program works on prevention of FASD with high-risk mothers and families. Referrals are provided for diagnosis and other services for individuals who may have an FASD. Traditional substance abuse counseling and standard practitioner services are also provided.

Phone: 828-871-7945

Back to Top

PUBLICATIONS AND EDUCATIONAL MATERIALS

Toolkits, Professional Guides, and Curriculums

A Practical Native American Guide for Professionals Working with Children, Adolescents, and Adults with Fetal Alcohol Syndrome and Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
Robin A. LaDue, Ph.D.
Published: 2000, Rockville, MD, Indian Health Service.

This manual provides an overview of FAS and FASD and attendant culturally appropriate guidelines for professionals working with individuals with an FASD. It is organized by specific domains in chronological order that are addressed by professionals. This work was supported by an IHS grant and administered through the Northwest Portland Area Indian Health Board.

Available online:

Beyond the 7th Generation: Faces Yet to Come: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders Prevention Curriculum for Middle School Age Youth
Strech, G., 1998, American Indian Institute.

The 7th Generation Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) prevention curriculum is created for American Indian students in grades six through eight in a classroom setting. The curriculum is designed to be used in combination with the video “Faces Yet to Come” included with the curriculum. The curriculum includes several activities to FAS prevention to stimulate learning and discussion. The curriculum has 16 lessons.

Available for order from the University of Oklahoma OUTREACH National Resource Center for Youth Services: www.nrcys.ou.edu/catalog/product.php?productid=156 Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Beyond the 7th Generation: Remembering What We Know: Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorders (FASD) Prevention Curriculum for High School and Young Adult Age Groups
Strech, G., 1998, American Indian Institute.

The 7th Generation Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) and Fetal Alcohol Effects (FAE) prevention curriculum is created for American Indian high school students and young adults in a classroom setting. The curriculum is designed to be used in combination with the video “Remembering What We Know,” included with the curriculum. The curriculum contains several activities related to FAS prevention, to stimulate learning and discussion.

Available for order from the University of Oklahoma OUTREACH National Resource Center for Youth Services: www.nrcys.ou.edu/catalog/product.php?productid=156 Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Gifts From the Sacred Circle: A Native Traditional Parenting Curriculum for Families Affected By Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder
White Shield, R., 2012, Center City, MN, Hazelden.

Gifts from the Sacred Circle is an evidence-based program created for Native children and families affected by FASD. The curriculum is rooted in traditional American Indian spiritual contexts. The complete curriculum includes a facilitator’s guide, a parent resource book, and a toolkit with materials that help connect and extend the learning experiences into the home and community. Gifts from the Sacred Circle supports and strengthens families as they care for their children affected by FASD and themselves. The program identifies cultural strengths and resiliency factors that contribute to success as a caregiver of a child affected by FASD.

Available for order online: www.hazelden.org Exit Disclaimer Graphic
Toll free: 800-328-9000

Healthy Native Babies Project Workbook and Toolkit
Published: 2010, Bethesda, MD, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, National Institutes of Health, Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development.

The Healthy Native Babies Project workbook and toolkit is available from the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development, National Institutes of Health. The Healthy Native Babies Project workbook packet includes updated versions of the workbook and toolkit along with a handout on Healthy Action for Native Babies. The workbook is a comprehensive and up-to-date guide for health professionals, social workers, community organizers, and anyone working in Native communities. The easy-to-read, informative text outlines the facts of sudden infant death syndrome, action steps to reduce the risk, and strategies for reaching communities. The toolkit provides helpful information on how to adjust communication strategies for individuals who may have fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASD). The toolkit disk allows individuals to design culturally appropriate and regionally specific materials, such as posters, flyers, postcards, and brochures. The Healthy Actions for Native Babies handout provides visual and easy-to-read information tailored for individuals who have difficulty reading or who have cognitive problems including FAS, FASD, and traumatic brain injury. The packet is free and can be ordered online.

Download online: http://www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs/Documents/healthy_native_babies_workbook.pdf PDF icon
Order online: www.nichd.nih.gov/publications/pubs_details.cfm?from&pubs_id=5733
Phone: 800-370-2943
TTY: 888-320-6942

Back to Top

Books and Educational Materials

The Coming of the Blessing: A Pathway to a Healthy Pregnancy
Published: 2009, Atlanta, GA, March of Dimes

The Coming of the Blessing: A Pathway to a Healthy Pregnancy booklet is part of an initiative from March of Dimes for American Indian and Alaska Native families. The booklet is designated as a "promising practice"; by the Indian Health Service. As part of the initiative, March of Dimes offers prenatal education, training, and resources to families. The booklet contains traditional beliefs, provides information on having a healthy pregnancy, and addresses the role of partners.

Phone: 914-997-4488
Available for order online: www.marchofdimes.com/catalog/ Exit Disclaimer Graphic
Web site: www.comingoftheblessing.com Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Journey Through the Healing Circle Book Series

The Little Fox: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Your Special Child Birth to 5 Years Old (Journey Through the Healing Circle)
Published: 2000, Seattle, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services.

This story portrays a mother and father fox and their young daughter fox who has FAS. The focus is on children up to age 5 years. The story was created to help people understand the health problems and behavior challenges of children with an FASD resulting from the prenatal effects of alcohol on the brain.

Download online: www.dshs.wa.gov/pdf/publications/22-320.pdf Exit Disclaimer Graphic PDF icon

The Little Mask: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Your Special Child Between 6-11 Years Old (Journey Through the Healing Circle)
Published: 2000, Seattle, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services.

This book portrays two young raccoons with FAS and FAE who are left to fend for themselves in a strange alcohol-related accident. The focus is on age 6 through 11 years.

Download online: www.dshs.wa.gov/pdf/publications/22-356.pdf Exit Disclaimer Graphic PDF icon

The Little Fox: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Your Special Child Between 12-17 Years Old (Journey Through the Healing Circle)
Published: 2000, Seattle, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services.

This book tells of the day-to-day challenges of FAS and FAE through the story of a family of bears. The focus is on youth age 12 through 17 years.

Download online: www.dshs.wa.gov/pdf/publications/22-359.pdf Exit Disclaimer Graphic PDF icon

The Little Fox: Fetal Alcohol Syndrome: Your Special Child Between 18-22 Years Old (Journey Through the Healing Circle)
Published: 2000, Seattle, Washington State Department of Social and Health Services.

This book portrays a young puffin with FAS or FAE who is left to fend for himself in a tragic alcohol-related accident. The focus is on age 18 through 22 years.

Download online: www.dshs.wa.gov/pdf/publications/22-360.pdf Exit Disclaimer Graphic PDF icon

Sam's Bear (L'ourson de Sam)
National Indian & Inuit Community Health Representatives Organization
Published: 2009, Kahnawake, Quebec.

The National Indian & Inuit Community Health Representatives Organization is a national nonprofit organization representing First Nation and Inuit Community Health Representatives in Canada. Sam's Bear (L'ourson de Sam) was created to raise awareness of brain development and FASD. This book targets children age 5 through 8 years. The second half of the book targets caregivers and teachers. The book explains the impact of substance abuse to children and their parents. Sam's Bear is available in French and English free of charge, but shipping and handling charges apply. It is also available on the Web site in PowerPoint form for presentations.

Web site: www.niichro.com/2004/ Exit Disclaimer Graphic

Back to Top

Note: The list of non-Federal resources presented here is not exhaustive, and inclusion on the list does not constitute an endorsement by SAMHSA or HHS.